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From 9 January through 20 January 1978, Honeywell conducted a wind tunnel test on a 1/30 scale partial heliostat field. The heliostats were per Honeywell's design developed under the 10 megawatt central receiver pilot electrical power plant subsystem research experiment contract. Likewise, the scaled section of the field geometry duplicated the proposed circular layout. Testing was conducted at the Georgia Institute of Technology's 9 foot subsonic tunnel. The objective of the test was to ascertain from a qualitative standpoint the field effects upon wind loading within a heliostat field. To accomplish this, numerous pressure tap measurements at different heights and at different field positions were taken with varying wind speeds, fence designs, and heliostat gimbal orientations. The Department of Energy specified boundary layer profile was also scaled by 1/30 in order to simulate the total wind effects as accurately as possible taking into account the potentially severe scaling or Reynolds number effects at a 1/30 scale. After initial model set-up within the tunnel and scaled boundary layer generated, 91 separate runs were accomplished. The results do demonstrate the high sensitivity of wind loading upon the collector field due to the actual heliostat orientation and fence geometry. Vertical pressure gradients within the model field and flow reentry angles provide a good qualitative feel as to the full scale environment that might be expected and point to the need for specific additional testing to further explore potentially dangerous conditions.
This index or manufacturers, distributors, researchers and others was prepared by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) under contract to Rockwell International Corporation. Rockwell International, in turn, is contracted with the Department of Energy to provide management and technical support for the development of wind systems for farm and rural use. The index is organized into two sections. The first section lists only names of individuals and organizations by category of interest: Manufacturer, distributor, researcher or other. Where a respondent listed more than one category that respondent's name appears under each. The second section is a compilation of all information supplied by respondents to the questionnaire. Entries are in alphabetical order by organization or individual name.
To determine the feasibility of wind-electric systems, six generation expansion alternatives were examined for Hart, Michigan--a city of 2,500 located near Lake Michigan where the average coastal wind velocities range from 5 to 7 m/s. Five of the alternatives included combinations of 500 and 1500 kW wind turbines (1975 GE parameters) and a 1 MW hydro plant while the last was a 3600 kW diesel generator. Wind velocity was estimated using data from U.S. Coast Guard stations along the shore and verified by a two-year measurement program. The Hart electrical system was represented by an hourly production cost program and the total cost calculations followed the ERDA/EPRI standard for solar energy evaluation.
This study was directed at a review of storage technologies, and particularly those which might be best suited for use in conjunction with wind and photovoltaics. The potential ''worth'' added by incorporating storage was extensively analyzed for both wind and photovoltaics. Energy storage concepts studied include (1) above ground pumped hydro storage, (2) underground pumped hydro storage, (3) thermal storage-oil, (4) thermal storage-steam, (5) underground compressed air storage, (6) pneumatic storage, (7) lead-acid batteries, (8) advanced batteries, (9) inertial storage (flywheel), (10) hydrogen generation and storage, and (11) superconducting magnetic energy storage. The investigations performed and the major results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this volume. (WHK)
A study was undertaken to design a 40-ft diameter wind turbine employing the UTRC/ERDA Self-Regulating Composite Bearingless Rotor (CBR) concept. The CBR concept was developed at United Technologies for rotary wing applications and is now in use on Sikorsky helicopters. The concept was further developed for wind turbine applications at UTRC under an ERDA contract in 1975-76. Successful wind tunnel tests were conducted during that contract, which demonstrated the self-starting and self-regulating features. The latest contract was to design a 40-ft system in the 5 kW - 15 kW power range. This effort included performance tradeoff studies, stress analyses of the blade and tower structure, a stability investigation, and engineering drawings of the complete system. However an overall cost analysis was not performed in this study.
The economic analysis of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine is contained in four separate volumes. The first volume summarizes the complete study, presenting a description of the technical approach used, key results, and major conclusions.
The economic analysis of the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine is contained in four separate volumes. The first volume summarizes the complete study, presenting a description of the technical approach used, key results, and major conclusions.
This report is part of a four-volume study of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) economics. This volume describes a computer model of VAWT cost and performance factors useful for system design and optimization. Output data are presented to demonstrate selection of optima and to indicate sensitivity of energy cost to design parameter variations. Optimized specifications generated by this model for six point designs are summarized. These designs subsequently received a detailed economic analysis discussed in Volume IV.
This report is part of a four-volume study of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) economics. This volume describes a computer model of VAWT cost and performance factors useful for system design and optimization. Output data are presented to demonstrate selection of optima and to indicate sensitivity of energy cost to design parameter variations. Optimized specifications generated by this model for six point designs are summarized. These designs subsequently received a detailed economic analysis discussed in Volume IV.
Volume III of this study discusses major features of the Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbine design including the blades, the speed increaser, guy cables and cable anchors, transmission, clutch, brakes, and the electrical system. System weight characteristics are tabulated. The report discusses operations of the point designs for 120, 200, 500, and 1600-kW Darrieus vertical-axis wind-energy systems. These same point designs are used for the detailed economic analyses discussed in Volume IV.

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