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In 2017, wind energy experts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) made significant strides to advance wind energy. Many of these achievements were presented in articles published in scientific and engineering journals and technical reports that detailed research accomplishments in new and progressing wind energy technologies. During fiscal year 2017, NREL wind energy thought leaders shared knowledge and insights through 45 journal articles and 25 technical reports, benefiting academic and national-lab research communities; industry stakeholders; and local, state, and federal decision makers. Such publications serve as important outreach, informing the public of how NREL wind research, analysis, and deployment activities complement advanced energy growth in the United States and around the world. The publications also illustrate some of the noteworthy outcomes of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding, as well as funding and facilities leveraged through strategic partnerships and other collaborations.
The goal of this analysis was to assess the wind power forecast accuracy of the Vermont Weather Analytics Center (VTWAC) forecast system and to identify potential improvements to the forecasts. Based on the analysis at Georgia Mountain, the following recommendations for improving forecast performance were made: 1. Resolve the significant negative forecast bias in February-March 2017 (50% underprediction on average) 2. Improve the ability of the forecast model to capture the strong diurnal cycle of wind power 3. Add ability for forecast model to assess internal wake loss, particularly at sites where strong diurnal shifts in wind direction are present. Data availability and quality limited the robustness of this forecast assessment. A more thorough analysis would be possible given a longer period of record for the data (at least one full year), detailed supervisory control and data acquisition data for each wind plant, and more detailed information on the forecast system input data and methodologies.
The Republic of the Philippines is home to abundant solar, wind, and other renewable energy (RE) resources that contribute to the national government's vision to ensure sustainable, secure, sufficient, accessible, and affordable energy. Because solar and wind resources are variable and uncertain, significant generation from these resources necessitates an evolution in power system planning and operation. To support Philippine power sector planners in evaluating the impacts and opportunities associated with achieving high levels of variable RE penetration, the Department of Energy of the Philippines (DOE) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) have spearheaded this study along with a group of modeling representatives from across the Philippine electricity industry, which seeks to characterize the operational impacts of reaching high solar and wind targets in the Philippine power system, with a specific focus on the integrated Luzon-Visayas grids.
The available "readme" file introduces the basics of the Doppler lidar data and offers a detailed description of the variables present in the data files. If you have any further questions about the data and its interpretation, contact either Alan Brewer (<alan.brewer@noaa.gov>) or Aditya Choukulkar (<aditya.choukulkar@noaa.gov>). It is highly recommended to discuss any planned use of the data with NOAA-CSD scientists. For more information, refer to the attached readme.
The available "readme" file introduces the basics of the Doppler lidar data and offers a detailed description of the variables present in the data files. If you have any further questions about the data and its interpretation, contact either Alan Brewer (<alan.brewer@noaa.gov>) or Aditya Choukulkar (<aditya.choukulkar@noaa.gov>). It is highly recommended to discuss any planned use of the data with NOAA-CSD scientists. For more information, refer to the attached readme.
The available "readme" file introduces the basics of the Doppler lidar data and offers a detailed description of the variables present in the data files. For those with any further questions about the data and its interpretation, contact either Alan Brewer (<alan.brewer@noaa.gov>) or Aditya Choukulkar (<aditya.choukulkar@noaa.gov>). It is highly recommended to discuss any planned use of the data with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Chemical Sciences Division (NOAA-CSD) scientists. For more information, refer to the Readme file: "noaa-esrl-arlingtonlidar-readme-1.pdf."
The available "Readme" file introduces the basics of the Doppler lidar data and offers a detailed description of the variables present in the data files. For those with any further questions about the data and its interpretation, contact either Alan Brewer (<alan.brewer@noaa.gov>) or Aditya Choukulkar (<aditya.choukulkar@noaa.gov>). It is highly recommended to discuss any planned use of the data with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Chemical Sciences Division (NOAA-CSD) scientists. For more information, refer to the Readme file: "noaa-esrl-wascolidar-readme.docx."
The available "Readme" file introduces the basics of the Doppler lidar data and offers a detailed description of the variables present in the data files. For those with any further questions about the data and its interpretation, contact either Alan Brewer (<alan.brewer@noaa.gov>) or Aditya Choukulkar (<aditya.choukulkar@noaa.gov>). It is highly recommended to discuss any planned use of the data with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Chemical Sciences Division (NOAA-CSD) scientists. For more information, refer to the Readme file: "noaa-esrl-wascolidar-readme.docx."

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