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State of Maryland - University of Maryland College Park

  • Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building 

University of Maryland College Park

Showcase Project: State of Maryland

Location

College Park, MD

Project Size

170,000 square feet

Financial Overview

Project Cost $350,000

Annual Energy Use (Source EUI)

Baseline
(2012)
589 kBtu/sq. ft.
Expected
(2015)
471 kBtu/sq. ft.
Actual
COMING IN 2015

Expected
Energy Savings:

20%

Annual Energy Cost

Baseline
(2012)
$1,294,000
Expected
(2015)
$1,0961,000
Actual
COMING IN 2015

Expected
Savings:

$197,000



Background

The University of Maryland College Park has targeted the Kim Engineering building to undergo an energy efficiency retrofit based on its high Energy Use Intensity (EUI). The facility, which came online in 2005, is one of the newer facilities on campus and ideal for re-commissioning after eight years of occupancy. This project is expected to result in an energy and cost savings of 20% and $197,000.

Background

The Kim Engineering building is a typical higher education building that contains mixed-use spaces including: classroom space, small and large meeting rooms, as well as administrative offices. In addition, the building features numerous research facilities, including a clean room and nano/micro fabrication lab, as well as instructional facilities such as modern engineering materials and thermal fluids laboratories.

Solutions

As a first step in the project, the University plans to determine whether an energy model was performed for this facility during its design/construction. If a model is located, an attempt will be made to bring the building operations in line with its original design intent through the re-commissioning process, where each building system is reviewed and evaluated for use and performance.

Solutions

If an energy model is not available, the University plans to document current conditions and develop system manuals to maximize efficiency without returning the building to its design baseline and while still achieving the planned 20% reduction in EUI from a 2008 baseline. The EUI for the 2008 baseline year is 410 kBtu/GSF, which is significantly higher than other similar buildings on campus. Strategies might include but are not limited to the following:

  • Defining/refining occupancy schedules;
  • Tightening the building envelope;
  • Instituting occupant education/behavior modification;
  • Evaluating system operations and parameters;
  • Refining/upgrading the building automation system;
  • Installing an energy management system;
  • Appointing a dedicated facility manager to proactively address issues while monitoring performance; and
  • Implementing capital improvements.

The project is slated to begin in the Fall of 2013 and the duration is estimated at 12-24 months.

Other Benefits

In addition to the energy efficiency improvements planned, the building is truly unique in that it serves as a teaching/learning tool for faculty and students. The facility features exposed columns and beams which show off color-coded pipes for HVAC systems, IT cables, electrical and controls conduits and air ducts. Examples of truss and suspension bridges are available for study, and windows contain various types of glazing for different performance requirements.

Other Benefits

Students are encouraged to perform tests, take measurements, and experience firsthand the concepts they learn in textbooks. The building is designed to encourage and support collaboration and multi-disciplinary approaches to engineering.