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Cummins Inc. - Jamestown Engine Plant

  • Aerial view of Jamestown Engine Plant 
  • Workers installing air handlers outside plant 
  • New duct work installed at the engine plant 
  • New roof features more insulation than old 

Jamestown Engine Plant: Facility-Wide Energy and Infrastructure Improvement Project

Showcase Project: Cummins Inc.

Location

Lakewood, NY

Project Size

995,000 Square Feet

Financial Overview

Project Cost $23.8 Million

Annual Energy Use (Source EUI)

Baseline
(2011)
4.62 MMBTU/
equivalent engine
Expected
(2016)
4.09 MMBTU/
equivalent engine
Actual
COMING SOON

Expected
Energy Savings:

11%

Annual Energy Cost

Baseline
(2011)
$36.37 per
engine equivalent
Expected
(2016)
$31.26 per
engine equivalent
Actual
COMING SOON

Expected
Savings:

14%



Background

Cummins is undertaking a deep energy retrofit project at its Jamestown Engine Plant (JEP) in Lakewood, NY, as part of its corporate-wide commitment to reduce energy intensity. The project combines a suite of energy efficiency measures and necessary infrastructure upgrades to achieve significant energy savings alongside optimal systems performance for the entire facility.

Solutions

Beginning in January 2012 through 2015, Cummins is implementing a phased, whole building energy and infrastructure improvement project. The total project cost is $23.8 million. $9.2 million is going directly for plant infrastructure upgrades, while the additional $14.6 million is being spent to replace the plant’s roof. Of the $9.2 million in infrastructure upgrades, about $1.7 million is being spent strictly for the purpose of improving energy performance. Similarly, out of the $14.6 million roof project, $1.6 million is being spent specifically to improve thermal efficiency.

Other Benefits

The JEP project approach contributes to Cummins’ corporate environmental responsibility initiatives. The project is expected to reduce plant wide greenhouse gas emissions by 10%, or about 2,900 metric tons. Additionally, Cummins builds to the standards of green building certification; therefore, the JEP site may consider obtaining certification in the future.

Infrastructure upgrade: Efficient air handling

Background

Cummins acquired JEP in 1974, though the facility dates back to 1968 and much of the original base infrastructure within the building remains. This includes three large gas fired steam boilers, related distribution piping, 26 large heating and ventilating units, 29 dock heaters and 5 snow melt systems. This equipment has become unreliable, incurring significant repair costs and operational interruptions. Through this project, steam is almost entirely being eliminated by replacing the major equipment (air handlers, dock heaters, etc.) with direct fired gas units. A few localized manufacturing processes, however, utilize steam; as a result, the plant plans to install three small steam generators to meet that limited local variable demand. This eliminates the need for a plant wide distribution.

Solutions

The energy efficiency components of the project include heating and cooling upgrades, compressed air optimization and controls upgrades. The compressed air improvements include reduced line pressure, implementation of improved metering, implementation of a sequencing system to automatically stage the compressors to match variable demand and a preventive maintenance system to ultrasonically detect and fix air leaks. The two major energy impacts of the plant-wide improvements are natural gas and electricity, with approximate savings of 41% and 5% from current usages, respectively.

Prior to the project, JEP partnered with Duke Energy One and Mazza, to complete a thorough site assessment. The significant uses on energy were identified, equipment condition assessed and replacement and improvement alternatives individually analyzed. Significant uses of energy were primarily facility based and included all air handlers, air conditioning systems, ventilation systems, exhaust fans, dock heaters, steam users and other pieces of equipment were also evaluated. The energy savings of the alternatives were calculated and the needed funding for the entire project is planned within the corporation’s capital process. The plant’s investment has been planned within Cummins’ multi-year budget and has been included in the business' simulation to ensure profitability. Cummins uses a 20% internal rate of return as its criteria for priority projects. In particular, the plant very carefully evaluated the added cost to become more efficient versus simply replacing the older models with like steam equipment. In a related improvement, the plant replaced its old roof (a project it was going to do anyway) with a new light colored roof with more insulation to reduce cooling and heating load. As of August 2012, four large air handling units have been installed on the outside of the plant, replacing six less efficient ones.

Cummins anticipates that the energy savings from just the energy efficiency-specific measures will be more than 68 billion BTUs and result in $661,000 a year in cost savings. This means the $3.3 million energy efficiency investment will pay off in five years.

Other Benefits

Part of Cummins’ company mission is demanding that everything it does leads to a cleaner, healthier and safer environment. The Jamestown plant is very actively engaged in projects in keeping with the Cummins’ mission. The plant was the first Cummins site to achieve zero landfill status, a significant accomplishment. The plant’s water projects include controlling water run-off, eliminating all ground contamination and effectively treating waste streams before they go to the sewer district. JEP has moved to using more environmentally–friendly chemicals, and its tree planting initiative achieves both site beautification and carbon capture.