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Cleveland Clinic Foundation - Tomsich Pathology Laboratories

  • Exterior of the Tomsich Pathology Laboratories 

Cleveland Clinic Foundation

Showcase Project: Tomsich Pathology Laboratories

Location

Cleveland, OH

Project Size

135,500 Square Feet

Annual Energy Use (Source EUI)

Baseline
ASHRAE Standard
241.8 kBtu/sq. ft
Expected
(2013)
177.4 kBtu/sq. ft
Actual
(2013)
COMING SOON

Expected
Energy Savings:

27%

Annual Energy Cost

Baseline
ASHRAE Standard
$600,000
Expected
(2013)
$435,000
Actual
(2013)
COMING SOON

Expected
Savings:

$165,000

Expected annual energy and cost savings of calculated using a baseline of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, Appendix G methodology.



Background

Cleveland Clinic Tomsich Pathology Laboratories is a new expansion building for the Robert J. Tomsich Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute (RT-PLMI). RT-PLMI is among the largest volume hospital labs in the U.S. The lab offers state-of-the-art diagnostic services in microbiology, special chemistry, immunopathology, and molecular pathology, as well as expert diagnosis to patients institutionally, regionally and nationally.

Solutions

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation employed a number of strategies to reduce energy use in the new facility. Providing a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors for all building occupants was an important objective for the project team. The building design maximizes day lighting opportunities and affords access to views to 92% of the building’s regularly occupied space by applying extensive exterior and interior glazing in both the office and laboratory areas.

Other Benefits

LEED-NC v2.2 Gold Rating achieving 5 credits in EAc1 for Optimizing Energy Performance.

The use of a chase wall system and modular, movable casework optimizes flexibility of the space and would reduce the amount of debris generated during future renovation.

Inside the Tomsich Pathology Laboratories

Background

The Robert J. Tomsich Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute performs over 20 million tests per year, processes 50,000 specimens per day, and operates around the clock, seven days per week.

The Tomsich Pathology Laboratories project was undertaken to develop a state-of-the-art capability to offer testing of tissues and other samples to help the medical community detect, diagnose and treat disease. It expands and upgrades Cleveland Clinic’s ability to offer medical testing and consultation services to other healthcare institutions nationally. Cleveland Clinic is committed to designing and building safe, green buildings using evidence-based design and the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating systems to deliver healthier environments in which to work and heal. All new major construction projects pursue LEED certification as a minimum with a target of Silver certification. In addition, projects are required to achieve a minimum of 5 credits in the LEED Energy and Atmosphere category to ensure the design and engineering teams are focused on delivering an energy efficient building. To date, Cleveland Clinic has 13 LEED certified projects in its portfolio.

Solutions

Day lighting controls were utilized on the first two rows of lighting on the east, south and west facing edges of the building to achieve an optimum lighting level, while maximizing energy savings. To reduce solar heat gain in summer, horizontal sunshades on the east, west and south facades were used.

Lighting power densities were further reduced with the installation of LED lighting to meet upwards of 90% of the building’s interior lighting needs, and through the installation of occupancy sensors in all offices and conference rooms.

The project further reduced energy consumption with advanced, responsive systems including a high efficiency chiller, high efficiency hot water boiler, high efficiency cooling tower, high efficiency unitary cooling equipment and high efficiency service hot water boilers, demand control ventilation and exhaust air energy recovery.

The building combines a vegetative roofing system over the administrative block, representing 27% of the roof area, with a solar-reflective white EPDM roof above the remainder. These strategies reduce the heat island effect and required cooling loads among other benefits.

This facility undertook a program of enhanced commissioning to verify and ensure that the building was designed, constructed, and calibrated to operate as intended. Cleveland Clinic is also committed to retro-commissioning the building to ensure its systems operate as designed over time. A systems manual articulates the intent of each system, the sequence of operations, and any critical modifications made. The manual is used by building operating staff for reference and training.

This facility was constructed on the footprint of the existing main campus and utility connections were run off of existing infrastructure. The building is independently metered and Cleveland Clinic is committed to reporting actual utility usage once data connections are established.

Projected percent savings by end use:

  • Interior Lighting (Electric) – 20%
  • Space Heating (Natural Gas) – 27%
  • Space Cooling (Electric) – 59%
  • Fans – HVAC Systems (Electric) – 47%

Other Benefits

This project also marked the first installation of porous pavement in the Cleveland Clinic portfolio. Pervious concrete pavement was used for the surface parking lot that drains to a stone blanket leading to a trapped outlet structure to collect sediments. Yard drainage is conveyed to inlets connected with perforated pipe. Most runoff from the site is anticipated to be absorbed into the native sandy soils before it reaches the storm drain infrastructure.