AT A GLANCE

+200 members from the public and private sectors

Controlling +10 billion square feet of commercial building space

Working together through 5 sector groups and 15 solutions teams

Making commercial buildings
20% more efficient by 2020

Commercial buildings—our offices, schools, hospitals, restaurants, hotels and stores—consume nearly 20% of all energy used in the United States. We spend more than $200 billion each year to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by commissioning existing systems so they operate as intended. Energy efficiency is a cost-effective way to save money, support job growth, reduce pollution, and improve competitiveness.

Through the Better Buildings Alliance, members in different market sectors work with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) exceptional network of research and technical experts to develop and deploy innovative, cost-effective, energy-saving solutions that lead to better technologies, more profitable businesses, and better buildings in which we work, shop, eat, stay, and learn. Join today to start saving energy in your commercial buildings.

View the recently published 2013 Annual Report, which reviews Better Buildings Alliance accomplishments for the year, highlights examples of members in action, and outlines plans for the current year.

Upcoming Events

  • September 9 Better than CFL? Dimmable LED Downlights in Hospitality Facilities
  • Better than CFL? Dimmable LED Downlights in Hospitality Facilities

    September 9, 2014
    1:00-2:00 PM EDT

    Presenter: Bob Davis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Andra Zinkon, Tec Studio Inc.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that there were about 700 million downlight luminaires installed in residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. as of 2012, with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires representing less than 1% of this installed base. In hospitality facilities, past efforts to reduce lighting energy use have mostly consisted of implementing compact fluorescent lamps (CFL). CFLs offer reduced energy consumption, higher efficacy, and much longer lifetimes than incandescent and halogen lamps, but they also have drawbacks. LEDs improve upon many of these drawbacks and offer an attractive combination of additional energy savings, longer lifetimes, and other lighting and control benefits. The Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel installed more than 3700 dimmable LED downlights in the guest rooms at their 450,000 square foot facility, which opened in October 2012. Why did they choose LED and not CFL? Do the LEDs deliver the light levels and color quality needed? How did they make sure the dimming and controls would work properly? Are they saving energy? Did they pay more initially? Would they do it again, and what would they change? Register here.

    Target Audience: Building owners, managers, operators, manufacturer, sales representatives and distributors, lighting consultants, lighting contractors, and utility and energy efficiency organizations

  • September 11 Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know
  • Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know

    September 11, 2014
    11:00 AM-12:00 PM EDT

    Presenter: Eric Richman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    The Adopting LED Technology: What Federal Facility Managers Need to Know webinar will provide an overview of the current status of LED technology as it relates to maturing applications, cautions, control options, and tools and resources to federal facility managers who make informed decisions. Webinar presenter Eric Richman of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will cover the following objectives:

    • • Understand the basics of LED technology, its strengths and weaknesses
    • • Know the specifics of LED attributes compared with other lighting technologies
    • • Address economic considerations with LEDs and perform effective cost-effectiveness evaluations
    • • Understand specific LED product application considerations
    Register here.


    Target Audience: Building owners, managers, manufacturer, sales representatives and distributors, lighting consultants, lighting contractors, and utility and energy efficiency organizations

  • September 16 Overview of the Advanced RTU with Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Audience
  • Overview of the Advanced RTU with Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Audience

    September 16, 2014
    2:00-3:30 PM EDT

    Presenter: Ian Adams, Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance; Michael Deru, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Matt Matenaer, Focus on Energy

    Older, inefficient commercial HVAC rooftop unit (RTU) air conditioning systems are common and can significantly waste a building’s energy costs. By replacing or retrofitting them, you can save money, improve your energy efficiency, make your building more comfortable, and help the environment. The Advanced RTU Campaign (ARC) encourages commercial building owners and operators to replace their old RTUs with more efficient units or to retrofit their RTUs with advanced controls in order to take advantage of these benefits. The Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) is a Supporter of the campaign, in collaboration with the lead organizers, ASHRAE, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings Alliance.

    This webinar is an introduction to ARC and a review of tools available to evaluate and implement high efficiency RTU technology. We will provide information on the energy and cost savings potential, benefits of joining the Campaign, how to join, and the myriad technical resources available for RTU evaluation and improvement. The webinar also feature information on programs and incentives available to businesses in the Midwest to help them make these RTU investments in their buildings, and a case study example from Focus on Energy, another ARC Supporter, of a Midwestern company’s RTU replacement with high-efficiency units.

    Register here.


    Target Audience: Contractors, building owners and operators, property managers and facility engineers.

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